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THE STORY OF

The 10th BATTALION The HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT) 1944 - 1945

RECORDED BY

The Late Captain R. T JOHNSTON Captain D. N. STEWARD and the Rev. A. IAN DUNLOP, Chaplain 

 

 

DEDICATED

DEDICATED

To the memory of the fifteen officers and two hundred and twenty six other ranks of the Battalion who were killed in action and died of wounds during the campaign.

 The history of a Unit can be recorded in two ways-in the dry, emotionless tone of the War Diary, or in the warmer, more human framework of a scrapbook. In the succeeding pages, it is intended to recall to mind incidents both before and during battle, not as the historian on a higher plane would regard them small, rather meaningless actions amidst a welter of numerous other and similar ones-but as actions and happenings that characterise and give life-blood to what we know as The 10th Battalion The Highland Light Infantry. Names and dates must ofnecessity be an integral part but if an excuse be necessary, we justify our action by saying that it will constitute the only complete and compact record of our comrades who gave their lives or shed their blood for cause and country.

THE DISTANT DAYS

An off-shoot of the 5th Battalion, this unit found its early pre-war days ones of no small military bewilderment, while a shortage of equipment and men did not help in the striving towards fighting efficiency. But from earliest days, through the cold, cheerless winter of 1939-1940, and on into the militarily cheerless summer of 1940, through the dark days of the Shetlands and the isolation of Wick, the form it was ultimately to take and the glory it was ultimately to achieve took shape, gradually but surely, under the guiding hands of Lieut.-Colonels L. S. Morrison, T.D., F.A. Hawkins, M.C., T. W. Hamilton and R. G. Collingwood. It would take too long, nor would there be much point, to dwell on the early days when order came out of chaos - Danbury, Bradwell, Latchingdon, Cold Norton, Ipswich, Orford, The Shetlands, Watten. For the old-timers, these names will conjure up some memory, but they are of the past and have little relation to the Unit that fought in Normandy and beyond. 

 

 

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